Solutions

Are you:

  • an employer;
  • an educator;
  • a media owner/producer; or
  • an event organizer?

If you are one or more of above, you need to make sure that your aural information is fully accessible to those who cannot hear or understand it.

There is a wide range of services that provide quality communication access to individuals with hearing loss in various areas of their lives – events, education, employment:

  • Videos and podcasts:
    You can make them accessible via captions and transcripts.
  • Streaming videos and webcasts:
    You can make them accessible by adding live captions.
  • Live events:
    You can make them accessible via CART services and by providing deaf and hard of hearing attendees with additional technologies and services (such as sign language interpreters, cued speech transliterators, etc).

Full and equal communication access is very important for deaf and hard of hearing people to make them feel included and enable them to enjoy events and to contribute to mainstream society on the equal basis with hearing peers.

Not all services are a one size fit for everyone or every event. Not all deaf/hoh people use sign language or can lipread everything. Someone with limited signing or typing skills is NOT qualified to assist a deaf/hoh person at a formal event. Only professional interpreters and captioners can provide good quality communication access.

  • Videos and podcasts:
    You can make them accessible via captions and transcripts.
  • Streaming videos and webcasts:
    You can make them accessible by adding live captions.
  • Live events:
    You can make them accessible via CART services and ask deaf and hard of hearing attendees if they need additional technologies and services.
  • Speech to text transcription:
    If you are thinking about a new career, you can be trained to become a CART writer. Court reporting is one of the fastest growing professions.
  • Visual language interpreting:
    If you are interested in visual languages, you can get training to become an interpreter.

Correct grammar, punctuation, and spelling with speaker identifications and sound descriptions are part of best practices – they are as important in audio transcription to clarify content as voice intonation and good enunciation are in oral speech.

Full communication accessibility is very important for deaf and hard of hearing people to make them feel included and enable them to enjoy the events and to contribute to the mainstream society on the equal basis with hearing peers.

(Video: Siri VS Furby)

(Video: CAPTION FAIL: Jamaican Vacation Hoax)

Full and equal communication access is very important for deaf and hard of hearing people to make them feel included and enable them to enjoy the events and to contribute to the mainstream society on the equal basis with hearing peers. There is a wide range of services that provide communication accessibility to individuals with hearing loss in the USA in various areas of their lives – events, education, employment. Not all services are one size fit for everyone or every event. Not all deaf/hoh people use sign language or can lipread everything. Someone with limited signing or typing skills is NOT qualified to assist a deaf/hoh person at a formal event. Only professional interpreters and captioners can provide good quality communication access.